iPinYou the first global RTB (Real-Time Bidding) algorithm competition

December 29th, 2013 Comments off
Offline Evaluation Result of iPinYou Bidding Algorithm Competition

Offline Evaluation Result of iPinYou Bidding Algorithm Competition

We are involved in the first global RTB bidding algorithm competition, organised by iPinYou. Our Phd Students Weinan Zhang and Shuai Yuan have won the third season offline competition. The result can be found here. In this season, data scientists from eight countries, including China, USA, UK, India and France, have participated in the competition and made over 2000 submissions. The IPinYou global RTB (Real-Time Bidding) algorithm competition kicks off on April 1, 2013. The purpose of this competition is to further improve the performance of DSP bidding algorithm, stimulate the interest of research and development of DSP bidding algorithms in the whole data science research community, and speed up the growth of RTB-enabled display advertising ecosystem. In the end, iPinYou expects this competition will help advertising technology companies serve our advertisers better. There are three Milestone Prizes and one Grand Prize (RMB 1,000,000) for the DSP bidding competition.

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CIKM2013 Tutorial: Real-Time Bidding: A New Frontier of Computational Advertising Research

July 30th, 2013 Comments off

Online advertising is now one of the fastest advancing areas in IT industry. In display and mobile advertising, the most significant development in recent years is the growth of Real-Time Bidding (RTB), which allows selling and buying online display advertising in real-time one ad impression at a time. Since then, RTB has fundamentally changed the landscape of the digital media market by scaling the buying process across a large number of available inventories. It also encourages behaviour (re-)targeting, and makes a significant shift toward buying focused on user data, rather than contextual data. A report from IDC shows that in 2011, global RTB based display ad spend increased by 237% compared to 2010, with the U.S.’s $2.2 billion RTB display spend leading the way. The market share of RTB-based spending of all display ad spending will grow from 10% in 2011 to 27% in 2016, and its share of all indirect spending will grow from 28% to 78%.

Scientifically, the further demand for automation, integration and optimization in RTB brings new research opportunities in the CIKM fields. For instance, the much enhanced flexibility of allowing advertisers and agencies to maximize impact of budgets by more optimised buys based on their own or 3rd party (user) data makes the online advertising market a step closer to the financial markets, where unification and interconnection are strongly promoted. The unification and interconnections across webpages, advertisers, and users require significant research on knowledge management, data mining, information retrieval, behaviour targeting and their links to game theory, economics and optimization.

Despite its rapid growth and huge potential, many aspects of RTB remain unknown to the research community for a variety of reasons. In this tutorial, teamed up with presenters from both the industry and academia, we aim to bring the insightful knowledge from the real-world systems, to bridge the gaps between industry and academia, and to provide an overview of the fundamental infrastructure, algorithms, and technical and research challenges of the new frontier of computational advertising.

http://tutorial.computational-advertising.org/

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Invited Talk at SIGIR03 Workshop on Internet Advertising

July 30th, 2013 Comments off

Financial Methods in Computational Advertising

http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/beijing/events/ia2013/Program.htm

http://www.slideshare.net/JunWang5/financial-methods-in-computational-advertising

Computational Advertising has recently emerged as a new scientific sub-discipline, bridging the gap among the areas such as information retrieval, data mining, machine learning, economics, and game theory. In this tutorial, I shall present a number of challenging issues by analogy with financial markets. The key vision is that display opportunities are regarded as raw material “commodities” similar to petroleum and natural gas – for a particular ad campaign, the effectiveness (quality) of a display opportunity shouldn’t rely on where it is brought and whom it belongs, but it should depend on how good it will benefit the campaign (e.g., the underlying web users’ satisfactions or respond rates). With this vision in mind, I will go through the recently emerged real-time advertising, aka Real-Time Bidding (RTB), and provide the first empirical study of RTB on an operational ad exchange. We show that RTB, though suffering its own issue, has the potential of facilitating a unified and interconnected ad marketplace, making it one step closer to the properties in financial markets. At the latter part of this talk, I will talk about Programmatic Premium, i.e., a counterpart to RTB to make display opportunities in future time accessible. For that, I will present a new type of ad contracts, ad options, which have the right, but no obligation to purchase ads. With the option contracts, advertisers have increased certainty about their campaign costs, while publishers could raise the advertisers’ loyalty. I show that our proposed pricing model for the ad option is closely related to a special exotic option in finance that contains multiple underlying assets (multi-keywords) and is also multi-exercisable (multi-clicks). Experimental results on real advertising data verify our pricing model and demonstrate that advertising options can benefit both advertisers and search engines.


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CIKM2013 Full Paper: Interactive Collaborative Filtering

July 18th, 2013 Comments off

Interactive Recommendation: a ‘chicken- or-the-egg’ problem.

In this paper, we study collaborative filtering (CF) in an interactive setting, in which a recommender system continuously recommends items to individual users and receives interactive feedback. Whilst users enjoy sequential recommendations, the recommendation predictions are constantly refined using up-to-date feedback on the recommended items. Bringing the interactive mechanism back to CF process is fundamental because the ultimate goal for a recommender system is about the discovery of interesting items for individual users and yet users’ personal preferences and contexts evolve over time during the interactions with the system. This requires us not to distinguish between the stages of collecting information to construct the user profile and making recommendations, but to seamlessly integrate these stages together during the interactive process, with the goal of maximizing the overall recommendation accuracy throughout the interactions. This mechanism naturally addresses the cold-start problem as any user can immediately receive sequential recommendations without providing ratings beforehand. We formulate Interactive CF with the probabilistic matrix factorization (PMF) framework, and leverage several exploitation-exploration algorithms to select items, including the empirical Thompson sampling and upper-confidence-bound-based algorithms. We conduct our experiment on cold-start users as well as warm-start users with drifting taste. Results show that the proposed methods have significant improvements over several strong baselines for the MovieLens, EachMovie and Netflix datasets.

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Working Paper: Multi-Keyword Multi-Click Option Contracts for Sponsored Search Advertising

July 18th, 2013 Comments off

Price movements of Keyword auctions.

In sponsored search, advertising slots are usually sold by a search engine to an advertiser through an auction mechanism in which advertisers bid on keywords. In theory, an auction mechanism encourages the advertisers to truthfully bid for keywords. However, keyword auctions have a number of problems including: (i) volatility in revenue, (ii) uncertainty in the bidding and charged prices for advertisers’ keywords, and (iii) weak brand loyalty between the advertiser and the search engine. To address these issues, we study the possibility of creating a special option contract that alleviates these problems. In our proposal, an advertiser purchases an option in advance from a search engine by paying an upfront fee, known as the option price. The advertiser then has the right, but no obligation, to then purchase specific keywords for a fixed cost- per-click (CPC) for a specified number of clicks in a specified period of time. Hence, the advertiser has increased certainty in sponsored search while the search engine could raise the customers’ loyalty. The proposed option contract can be used in conjunction with traditional keyword auctions. As such, the option price and corresponding fixed CPC price must be set such that there is no arbitrage opportunity. In this paper, we discuss an option pricing model tailored to sponsored search that deals with spot CPCs of targeted keywords in a generalized second price (GSP) auction. We show that the pricing model for keywords is closely related to a special exotic option in finance that contains multiple underlying assets (multi-keywords) and is also multi-exercisable (multi-clicks). Experimental results on real advertising data verify our pricing model and demonstrate that advertising options can benefit both advertisers and search engines.

http://arxiv.org/abs/1307.4980

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ACM RecSys13: To Personalize or Not: A Risk Management Perspective

July 16th, 2013 Comments off

Performance comparison of personalized and non-personalized recommendations.

Personalization techniques have been widely adopted in many recommender systems. However, experiments on real-word datasets show that for some users in certain contexts, personalized recommendations do not necessarily perform better than recommendations that rely purely on popularity. Broadly, this can be interpreted by the fact that the parameters of a personalization model are usually estimated from sparse data; the resulting personalized prediction, despite of its low bias, is often volatile. In this paper, we study the problem further by investigating into the ranking of recommendation lists. From a risk management and portfolio retrieval perspective, there is no difference between the popularity-based and the personalized ranking as both of the recommendation outputs can be represented as the trade-off between expected relevance (reward) and associated uncertainty (risk).  Through our analysis, we discover common scenarios and provide a technique to predict whether personalization will fail. Besides the theoretical understanding, our experimental results show that the resulting switch algorithm, which decides whether or not to personalize, outperforms the mainstream recommendation algorithms.

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AdKDD’13: Real-time Bidding for Online Advertising: Measurement and Analysis

July 16th, 2013 Comments off

the history of the Real-time Bidding

The real-time bidding (RTB), aka programmatic buying, has recently become the fastest growing area in online advertising. Instead of bulking buying and inventory-centric buying, RTB mimics stock exchanges and utilises computer algorithms to automatically buy and sell ads in real-time; It uses per impression context and targets the ads to specific people based on data about them, and hence dramatically increases the effectiveness of display advertising. In this paper, we provide an empirical analysis and measurement of a production ad exchange. Using the data sampled from both demand and supply side, we aim to provide first-hand insights into the emerging new impression selling infrastructure and its bidding behaviours, and help identifying research and design issues in such systems.  From our study, we observed that periodic patterns occur in various statistics including impressions, clicks, bids, and conversion rates (both post-view and post-click), which suggest time-dependent models would be appropriate for capturing the repeated patterns in RTB. We also found that despite the claimed second price auction, the first price payment in fact is accounted for 55.4 of total cost due to the arrangement of the soft floor price. As such, we argue that the setting of soft floor price in the current RTB systems puts advertisers in a less favourable position. Furthermore, our analysis on the conversation rates shows that the current bidding strategy is far less optimal, indicating the significant needs for optimisation algorithms incorporating the facts such as the temporal behaviours, the frequency and recency of the ad displays, which have not been well considered in the past.

http://arxiv-web3.library.cornell.edu/abs/1306.6542

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IATAP 2013: Adaptive Keywords Extraction with Contextual Bandits for Advertising on Parked Domains

July 16th, 2013 Comments off
Domain name registrars and URL shortener service providers place advertisements on the parked domains (Internet domain names which are not in service) in order to generate profits. As the web contents have been removed, it is critical to make sure the displayed ads are directly related to the intents of the visitors who have been directed to the parked domains. Because of the missing contents in these domains, it is non-trivial to generate the keywords to describe the previous contents and therefore the users intents. In this paper we discuss the adaptive keywords extraction problem and introduce an algorithm based on the BM25F term weighting and linear multi-armed bandits. We built a prototype over a production domain registration system and evaluated it using crowdsourcing in multiple iterations. The prototype is compared with other popular methods and is shown to be more effective.

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WWW2013 Full Paper: Interactive Exploratory Search for Multi Page Search Results

February 13th, 2013 Comments off
Modern information retrieval interfaces typically involve multiple
pages of search results, and users who are recall minded or engaging
in exploratory search using ad hoc queries are likely to access more
than one page. Document rankings for such queries can be improved
through introducing additional context to the query provided by the
user herself through using explicit ratings or implicit actions such
as clickthroughs. Existing methods using this information usually
involved detrimental UI changes that can lower user
satisfaction. Instead, we propose a new feedback scheme that makes use
of existing UIs and does not alter user’s browsing behaviours; to
maximise retrieval performance over multiple result pages, we propose
a novel retrieval optimisation framework and show that the optimal
ranking policy should choose a diverse, exploratory ranking to display
on the first page. Then, a personalised re-ranking of the next pages
can be generated based on the user’s feedback from the first page. We
show that document correlations used in result diversification have a
significant impact on relevance feedback and its effectiveness over a
search session. TREC evaluations demonstrate that our optimal rank
strategy (including approximative Monte Carlo Sampling) can naturally
optimise the trade-off between exploration and exploitation and
maximise the overall user’s satisfaction over time against a number of
similar baselines.
[bibtex file=mypublications.bib key=www2013-1]

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WWW2013 Full Paper: Probabilistic Group Recommendation via Information Matching

February 11th, 2013 Comments off
Increasingly, web recommender systems face scenarios where they need to serve suggestions two groups of users; for example, when families share e-commerce or movie rental web accounts. Research to date in this domain has proposed two approaches: computing recommendations for the group by merging any members’ ratings into a single profile, or computing ranked recommendations for each individual that are then merged via a range of heuristics. In doing so, none of the past approaches reason on the preferences that arise in individuals when they are members of a group. In this work, we present a probabilistic framework, based on the notion of information matching, for grouprecommendation. This model defines group relevance as a combination of the item’s relevance to each user as an individual and as a member of the group; it can then seamlessly incorporate any group recommendation strategy in order to rank items for a set of individuals. We evaluate the model’s efficacy of generating recommendations for both single individuals and groups using the MovieLens and MoviePilot data sets. In both cases, we compare our results with baselines and state-of-the-art collaborative filtering algorithms, and show that the model outperforms all others over a variety of ranking metrics.
[bibtex file=mypublications.bib key=www2013-2]

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